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Family Sheet

HUSBAND
Name: Elias Edward Horry Note Born: 21 Jun 1773 at Charleston, South Carolina Married: 23 Oct 1817 at St. Michaels, Charleston, South Carolina Died: 17 Sep 1834 at Charleston, South Carolina Other Spouses: Harriett Vanderhorst
Father: Thomas Horry Mother: Ann Branford
WIFE
Name: Mary Rutledge Shubrick Note Born: 23 Oct 1789 at Charleston, South Carolina Died: 14 Jan 1852 at Charleston, South Carolina Father: Thomas Shubrick Colonel Mother: Mary Branford
CHILDREN
Name: Thomas Lynch Horry Born: Abt 1818 Died:
Name: William Branford Shubrick Horry Born: 20 Sep 1818 Died:
Name: Alicia Mary Horry Born: 10 Aug 1820 Died:
Name: Elias Horry Born: 13 Feb 1822 Died: 1 May 1839
Name: Richard Shubrick Horry Born: 19 Sep 1823 Died:
Name: Julia Elizabeth Horry Born: 6 Jan 1825 Died: 15 Sep 1881 Husband: Benjamin Foisson Trapier Dr.
Name: Edward Shubrick Horry Born: 13 Jun 1827 at Charleston, South Carolina Died: 3 Dec 1892 at Grahamville, South Carolina Wife: Martha Caroline Webb
Name: Paul Trapier Horry Born: 17 Jun 1829 at South Carolina Died: 21 Oct 1878 at Santee, South Carolina Wife: Georgianna Heywood Raoul
NOTES
1). Elias Horry IV inherited a fortune from his father in plan tations and other properties and his interest in Bull s Isl and came from his second wife, Mary Shubrick. he kept recor ds of his family history in his father s Bible and erecte d monuments to the family s memory. He studied law in the o ffice of General C.C. Pinckney and was admitted to the ba r in 1773. He was Intendent of the City of Charleston fro m 1815 to 1817. Member and president of the Board of Truste es of the College of Charleston, President of the St. Cecil ia Society, Member of the Board of Trustees of the Medica l College as well as being active in many other religious a nd philanthropic organizations. He was the second presiden t of the South Carolina Canal and Railroad Company.
2). Of my mother  s two sisters, the elder, Mary, did not marr y till middle age, but spent her youth & early womanhood a t home. She had a large share of the beauty, which distingu ished the family & was quiet & amiable with less of vivacit y & imagination than either of her sisters, but of a practi cal matter of fact disposition, & very attentive to her dev otional duties. She was addressed by Mr. Elias Horry, a wid ower with a son & two daughters. I remember his formal visi ts to Belvedere in his handsome coach with outriders, his s tately walk upstairs with his gold headed cane, & his punct uality of arrival & departure. In due time, & after the com pletion of regular approaches, he carried his point, was ac cepted, & married, & took her to his home in the ancestra l Mansion, the solid substantial rough cast house at the corner of Meeting & Tradd Sts, Char leston, where she spent the rest of her days, surviving him , & two of her children, a son & daughter, t v leaving a da ughter & three sons. She was a brave woman, & in the days o f Nullification shewed her readiness to meet danger in th e spirit of her forefathers. She mingled little in society , but lived for & among her children, to whose welfare sh e gave herself up with entire self sacrifice, &, though no t always with the dearest perception of what would be for t heir highest good, yet with a sincere desire for the promot ion of their best interests in this world& in the next. Sh e died in the midst of them, justly lamented by the few wh o knew her intimately, & highly respected in the communit y at large.

						


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